1 GB DDR2 Ram for Laptop

 350

  • 3 Days checking Warranty.
  • Pulled-out from Branded Laptops

In stock

Compare

Description

1 GB DDR2 Ram for Laptop is also known as SDRAM, which is a double data rate synchronous dynamic random-access memory interface. It superseded the original DDR SDRAM specification, and is superseded by DDR3 SDRAM (launched in 2007). DDR2 DIMMs are neither forward compatible with DDR3 nor backward compatible with DDR.

In addition to double pumping the data bus as in DDR SDRAM (transferring data on the rising and falling edges of the bus clock signal), DDR2 allows higher bus speed and requires lower power by running the internal clock at half the speed of the data bus. The two factors combine to produce a total of four data transfers per internal clock cycle.

Since the DDR2 internal clock runs at half the DDR external clock rate, DDR2 memory operating at the same external data bus clock rate as DDR results in DDR2 being able to provide the same bandwidth but with higher latency. Alternatively, DDR2 memory operating at twice the external data bus clock rate as DDR may provide twice the bandwidth with the same latency. The best-rated DDR2 memory modules are at least twice as fast as the best-rated DDR memory modules.

The key difference between DDR2 and DDR SDRAM is the increase in prefetch length. In DDR SDRAM, the prefetch length was two bits for every bit in a word; whereas it is four bits in DDR2 SDRAM. During an access, four bits were read or written to or from a four-bit-deep prefetch queue. This queue received or transmitted its data over the data bus in two data bus clock cycles (each clock cycle transferred two bits of data. Increasing the prefetch length allowed DDR2 SDRAM to double the rate at which data could be transferred over the data bus without a corresponding doubling in the rate at which the DRAM array could be accessed. DDR2 SDRAM was designed with such a scheme to avoid an excessive increase in power consumption.

DDR2’s bus frequency is boosted by electrical interface improvements, on-die terminationprefetch buffers and off-chip drivers. However, latency is greatly increased as a trade-off. The DDR2 prefetch buffer is four bits deep, whereas it is two bits deep for DDR. While DDR SDRAM has typical read latencies of between two and three bus cycles, DDR2 may have read latencies between three and nine cycles, although the typical range is between four and six. Thus, DDR2 memory must be operated at twice the data rate to achieve the same latency.

Another cost of the increased bandwidth is the requirement that the chips are packaged in a more expensive and difficult to assemble BGA package as compared to the TSSOP package of the previous memory generations such as DDR SDRAM and SDR SDRAM. This packaging change was necessary to maintain signal integrity at higher bus speeds.

Power savings are achieved primarily due to an improved manufacturing process through die shrinkage, resulting in a drop in operating voltage (1.8 V compared to DDR’s 2.5 V). The lower memory clock frequency may also enable power reductions in applications that do not require the highest available data rates.

According to JEDEC[1] the maximum recommended voltage is 1.9 volts and should be considered the absolute maximum when memory stability is an issue (such as in servers or other mission critical devices). In addition, JEDEC states that memory modules must withstand up to 2.3 volts before incurring permanent damage (although they may not actually function correctly at that level).

Chips and modules

For use in computers, DDR2 SDRAM is supplied in DIMMs with 240 pins and a single locating notch. Laptop DDR2 SO-DIMMshave 200 pins and often come identified by an additional S in their designation. DIMMs are identified by their peak transfer capacity (often called bandwidth).

Standard
name
DRAM cell
array clock
Cycle
time
I/O bus
clock
Data
rate
Module
name
Peak
transfer
rate
Timings[2][3] CAS
Latency
(MHz) (ns) (MHz) (MT/s) (MB/s) (CL-tRCD-tRP) (ns)
DDR2-400B
DDR2-400C
100 10 200 400 PC2-3200 3200 3-3-3
4-4-4
15
20
DDR2-533B
DDR2-533C
133.33 7.5 266.67 533.33 PC2-4200* 4266.67 3-3-3
4-4-4
11.25
15
DDR2-667C
DDR2-667D
166.67 6 333.33 666.67 PC2-5300* 5333.33 4-4-4
5-5-5
12
15
DDR2-800C
DDR2-800D
DDR2-800E
200 5 400 800 PC2-6400 6400 4-4-4
5-5-5
6-6-6
10
12.5
15
DDR2-1066E
DDR2-1066F
266.67 3.75 533.33 1066.67 PC2-8500* 8533.33 6-6-6
7-7-7
11.25
13.125

Relative speed comparison between similar modules

PC-5300 PC-6400
5-5-5 4-4-4 6-6-6 5-5-5 4-4-4
PC2-3200 4-4-4  %  % 33% 60%  %
PC2-3200 3-3-3  %  % = 20%  %
PC2-4200 4-4-4  %  % = 21%  %
PC2-4200 3-3-3  %  % −24% −9%  %
PC2-5300 5-5-5  %  % = 21%  %
PC2-5300 4-4-4  %  % −19% −3%  %
PC2-6400 6-6-6  %  % = 20%  %
PC2-6400 5-5-5  %  % −16% =  %
PC2-6400 4-4-4  %  % −33% −20%  %
PC2-8500 7-7-7  %  % −12% 6%  %
PC2-8500 6-6-6  %  % −25% −9%  %

Some manufacturers label their DDR2 modules as PC2-4300, PC2-5400 or PC2-8600 instead of the respective names suggested by JEDEC. At least one manufacturer has reported this reflects successful testing at a higher-than-standard data rate[4] whilst others simply round up for the name.

Note: DDR2-xxx denotes data transfer rate, and describes raw DDR chips, whereas PC2-xxxx denotes theoretical bandwidth (with the last two digits truncated), and is used to describe assembled DIMMs. Bandwidth is calculated by taking transfers per second and multiplying by eight. This is because DDR2 memory modules transfer data on a bus that is 64 data bits wide, and since a byte comprises 8 bits, this equates to 8 bytes of data per transfer.

Additional information

Weight 0.5 kg