4 GB DDR3 Ram for Desktop Computer

 2,400  2,100

-13%
  • 3 Days checking Warranty.
  • Pulled-out from Branded System

In stock

Compare

Description

4 GB DDR3 Ram for Desktop Computer is a type of synchronous dynamic random-access memory(SDRAM) with a high bandwidth (“double data rate“) interface, and has been in use since 2007. It is the higher-speed successor to DDR and DDR2 and predecessor to DDR4 synchronous dynamic random-access memory(SDRAM) chips. DDR3 SDRAM is neither forward nor backward compatible with any earlier type of random-access memory (RAM) because of different signaling voltages, timings, and other factors.

DDR3 is a DRAM interface specification. The actual DRAM arrays that store the data are similar to earlier types, with similar performance.

The primary benefit of DDR3 SDRAM over its immediate predecessor, DDR2 SDRAM, is its ability to transfer data at twice the rate (eight times the speed of its internal memory arrays), enabling higher bandwidth or peak data rates. With two transfers per cycle of a quadrupled clock signal, a 64-bit wide DDR3 module may achieve a transfer rate (in megabytes per second, MB/s) of up to 64 times the memory clock speed (in MHz). With data being transferred 64 bits at a time per memory module, DDR3 SDRAM gives a transfer rate of (memory clock rate) × 4 (for bus clock multiplier) × 2 (for data rate) × 64 (number of bits transferred) / 8 (number of bits/byte). Thus with a memory clock frequency of 100 MHz, DDR3 SDRAM gives a maximum transfer rate of 6400 MB/s.

The DDR3 standard permits DRAM chip capacities of up to 8 gibibits, and up to 4 ranks of 64 bits each for a total maximum of 16 GiB per DDR3 DIMM. Because of a hardware limitation not fixed until Ivy Bridge-E in 2013, most older Intel CPUs only support up to 4 gibibit chips for 8 GiB DIMMs (Intel’s Core 2 DDR3 chipsets only support up to 2 gibibits). All AMD CPUs correctly support the full specification for 16 GiB DDR3 DIMMs.

Compared to DDR2 memory, DDR3 memory uses less power. This reduction comes from the difference in supply voltages: 1.8 V or 1.9 V for DDR2 versus 1.35 V or 1.5 V for DDR3. The 1.5 V supply voltage works well with the 90 nanometer fabrication technology used in the original DDR3 chips.[citation needed] Some manufacturers further propose using “dual-gate” transistors to reduce leakage of current.[2]

According to JEDEC,[3]:111 1.575 volts should be considered the absolute maximum when memory stability is the foremost consideration, such as in servers or other mission-critical devices. In addition, JEDEC states that memory modules must withstand up to 1.80 volts[a] before incurring permanent damage, although they are not required to function correctly at that level.[3]:109

Another benefit is its prefetch buffer, which is 8-burst-deep. In contrast, the prefetch buffer of DDR2 is 4-burst-deep, and the prefetch buffer of DDR is 2-burst-deep. This advantage is an enabling technology in DDR3’s transfer speed.

DDR3 modules can transfer data at a rate of 800–2133 MT/s using both rising and falling edges of a 400–1066 MHz I/O clock. This is twice DDR2’s data transfer rates (400–1066 MT/s using a 200–533 MHz I/O clock) and four times the rate of DDR (200–400 MT/s using a 100–200 MHz I/O clock). High-performance graphics was an initial driver of such bandwidth requirements, where high bandwidth data transfer between framebuffers is required.

Because the hertz is a measure of cycles per second, and no signal cycles more often than every other transfer, describing the transfer rate in units of MHz is technically incorrect, although very common. It is also misleading because various memory timingsare given in units of clock cycles, which are half the speed of data transfers.

DDR3 does use the same electric signaling standard as DDR and DDR2, Stub Series Terminated Logic, albeit at different timings and voltages. Specifically, DDR3 uses SSTL_15.[5]

DDR3 prototypes were announced in early 2005. Products in the form of motherboards appeared on the market in June 2007[6]based on Intel‘s P35 “Bearlake” chipset with DIMMs at bandwidths up to DDR3-1600 (PC3-12800).[7] The Intel Core i7, released in November 2008, connects directly to memory rather than via a chipset. The Core i7 supports only DDR3. AMD‘s first socket AM3 Phenom II X4 processors, released in February 2009, were their first to support DDR3.

Dual-inline memory modules

DDR3 dual-inline memory modules (DIMMs) have 240 pins and are electrically incompatible with DDR2. A key notch—located differently in DDR2 and DDR3 DIMMs—prevents accidentally interchanging them. Not only are they keyed differently, but DDR2 has rounded notches on the side and the DDR3 modules have square notches on the side.[8] DDR3 SO-DIMMs have 204 pins.[9]

For the Skylake microarchitecture, Intel has also designed a SO-DIMM package named UniDIMM, which can use either DDR3 or DDR4 chips. The CPU’s integrated memory controller can then work with either. The purpose of UniDIMMs is to handle the transition from DDR3 to DDR4, where pricing and availability may make it desirable to switch RAM type. UniDIMMs have the same dimensions and number of pins as regular DDR4 SO-DIMMs, but the notch is placed differently to avoid accidentally using in an incompatible DDR4 SO-DIMM socket.[10]

Latencies

DDR3 latencies are numerically higher because the I/O bus clock cycles by which they are measured are shorter; the actual time interval is similar to DDR2 latencies, around 10 ns. There is some improvement because DDR3 generally uses more recent manufacturing processes, but this is not directly caused by the change to DDR3.

CAS latency (ns) = 1000 × CL (cycles) ÷ clock frequency (MHz) = 2000 × CL (cycles) ÷ transfer rate (MT/s)

While the typical latencies for a JEDEC DDR2-800 device were 5-5-5-15 (12.5 ns), some standard latencies for JEDEC DDR3 devices include 7-7-7-20 for DDR3-1066 (13.125 ns) and 8-8-8-24 for DDR3-1333 (12 ns).

As with earlier memory generations, faster DDR3 memory became available after the release of the initial versions. DDR3-2000 memory with 9-9-9-28 latency (9 ns) was available in time to coincide with the Intel Core i7 release in late 2008,[11] while later developments made DDR3-2400 widely available (with CL 9–12 cycles = 7.5–10 ns), and speeds up to DDR3-3200 available (with CL 13 cycles = 8.125 ns).

Power consumption

Power consumption of individual SDRAM chips (or, by extension, DIMMs) varies based on many factors, including speed, type of usage, voltage, etc. Dell’s Power Advisor calculates that 4 GB ECC DDR1333 RDIMMs use about 4 W each.[12] By contrast, a more modern mainstream desktop-oriented part 8 GB, DDR3/1600 DIMM, is rated at 2.58 W, despite being significantly faster.[13]

JEDEC standard modules

Standard
name
DRAM cell
array clock
Cycle
time
I/O bus
clock
Data
rate
Module
name
Peak
transfer
rate
Timings CAS
Latency
(MHz) (ns) (MHz) (MT/s) (MB/s) (CL-tRCD-tRP) (ns)
DDR3-800D
DDR3-800E
100 10 400 800 PC3-6400 6400 5-5-5
6-6-6
12.5
15
DDR3-1066E
DDR3-1066F
DDR3-1066G
133.33 7.5 533.33 1066.67 PC3-8500 8533.33 6-6-6
7-7-7
8-8-8
11.25
13.125
15
DDR3-1333F*
DDR3-1333G
DDR3-1333H
DDR3-1333J*
166.67 6 666.67 1333.33 PC3-10600 10666.67 7-7-7
8-8-8
9-9-9
10-10-10
10.5
12
13.5
15
DDR3-1600G*
DDR3-1600H
DDR3-1600J
DDR3-1600K
200 5 800 1600 PC3-12800 12800 8-8-8
9-9-9
10-10-10
11-11-11
10
11.25
12.5
13.75
DDR3-1866J*
DDR3-1866K
DDR3-1866L
DDR3-1866M*
233.33 4.286 933.33 1866.67 PC3-14900 14933.33 10-10-10
11-11-11
12-12-12
13-13-13
10.56
11.786
12.857
13.929
DDR3-2133K*
DDR3-2133L
DDR3-2133M
DDR3-2133N*
266.67 3.75 1066.67 2133.33 PC3-17000 17066.67 11-11-11
12-12-12
13-13-13
14-14-14
10.313
11.25
12.188
13.125

* optional

DDR3-xxx denotes data transfer rate, and describes DDR chips, whereas PC3-xxxx denotes theoretical bandwidth (with the last two digits truncated), and is used to describe assembled DIMMs. Bandwidth is calculated by taking transfers per second and multiplying by eight. This is because DDR3 memory modules transfer data on a bus that is 64 data bits wide, and since a byte comprises 8 bits, this equates to 8 bytes of data per transfer.

The data rate (in MT/s) is twice the I/O bus clock (in MHz) due to the double data rate of DDR memory. As explained above, the bandwidth in MB/s is the data rate multiplied by eight.

CL – CAS Latency clock cycles, between sending a column address to the memory and the beginning of the data in response

tRCD – Clock cycles between row activate and reads/writes

tRP – Clock cycles between row precharge and activate

Fractional frequencies are normally rounded down, but rounding up to 667 is common because of the exact number being 666⅔ and rounding to the nearest whole number. Some manufacturers also round to a certain precision or round up instead. For example, PC3-10666 memory could be listed as PC3-10600 or PC3-10700.[14]

Note: All items listed above are specified by JEDEC as JESD79-3F.[3]:157–165All RAM data rates in-between or above these listed specifications are not standardized by JEDEC—often they are simply manufacturer optimizations using higher-tolerance or overvolted chips. Of these non-standard specifications, the highest reported speed reached was equivalent to DDR3-2544, as of May 2010.[15]

Alternative naming: DDR3 modules are often incorrectly labeled with the prefix PC (instead of PC3), for marketing reasons, followed by the data-rate. Under this convention PC3-10600 is listed as PC1333.

Additional information

Weight 0.5 kg